Technical Information

  1. Wireless broadband, high speed broadband,low cost broadband, Heriot Broadband, Community Broadband, Community Broadband Scotland,
    Mast Placements
    This aerial view shows the placement of the two main masts at Clints Hill and Nettlingflat with the line of sight straight to Easter Bush shown in orange. It also shows the relay to the masts on Corsehope and Dod Law shown in Pink. These masts relay the network by a wireless signal to local antennas on roofs and chimneys which then connect to the router of your computer by a cable. The network relies on line of sight for the radio signals to work, where there is no line of sight due to trees or other obstruction, signals can be bounced off other buildings to extend reach.
  2. Building of the Masts
    Building of the Masts
    The dishes to receive the signal from Easter Bush are placed on a scaffolding structure to create a mast. These are made like this to withstand the extreme weather conditions that occur in these exposed areas. The mast is fenced off to protect it from livestock. Gordon Hughes Director and Technical Advisor is seen here setting up the signal at Clints Hill. These dishes then transmit the network to relay masts and antennas on houses.
  3. HUBS
    HUBS
    HUBS or High Speed Universal Broadband for Scotland assists in the provision of high speed internet access to communities in rural areas of Scotland. HUBS accomplishes this by providing infrastructure support and technical expertise to local community networks which are ultimately owned and maintained by the communities themselves. HUBS is a joint enterprise between the University of the Highlands and Islands, University of Edinburgh and University of Stirling. With it's own independent network, HUBS is able to deliver high speed broadband speeds thus providing super fast next generation Internet services.

HCB Coverage 2018

Heriot Community Broadband is presently supplying a fast broadband service to properties throughout Heriot, even in the remotest locations. The map below shows the signals which supply the connections to antennae and masts around the area. The signal originates in Edinburgh and bounces to small masts on the top of local hills, these then bounce the signal to individual properties which then can relay to neighbouring properties.  A clear line of sight is required to a mast, antenna or relay antenna to get the service. 

The map also shows Stobo and Dawyk broadband network SDCN which works alongside Heriot Broadband.
Map, Heriot, Broadband, Community, Masts